What If Everybody Is A Genius?

What if I call you a wonderful writer, artist or a genius?

Either you would believe it or not believe it!

Human Nature One

As discussed in another blog post before, we are too quick to accept negativity. If I appreciate– you will doubt it. You need to hear those things from myriad other people before accepting them.

Wittgenstein

Human Nature Two

Our societies are ego based structures. Altruism is our nature but ego suppresses it. If I appreciate you as a genius–firstly you will not accept it-secondly if you do–you will keep observing me–and then–if I call another guy a genius and then another–you will label me as someone who exaggerates. Why? Continue reading “What If Everybody Is A Genius?”

Bartle Frere-200

Scribbling, Writing and in-between!

Compulsive scribbling is a telltale hallmark of a genius.

–Win Wenger

Or it could just be hypergraphia. Fyodor Dostoevsky had hypergraphia but he was a genius as well. Catharine M. Cox–an American Psychologist noted in her book Genetic Study of Geniuses: 301 Geniuses From Historythat a great number of them used to express their thoughts and feelings in journals or letters to their friends and relatives starting from a very young age. Dr. Win Wenger, Ph. D. and Richard Poe, expressed it very eloquently in their book The Einstein Factor, in Chapter 4: Amplifying The Feedback. They proposed that these very expressive young minds were not necessarily employing this expression because it was a dire necessity for their extremely active brain–but rather using it as a tool to achieve superior brain-functioning though often unknowingly or by chance. This argument is in the age-old nature versus nurture debate. Brain Plasticity is being widely accepted in the twenty-first century making the debate to lean in favor of nurture–thanks to pioneers like Win Wenger who have done valuable work in the field of accelerated learning.

Fyodor Dostoevsky

I discovered  The Einstein Factor in the year 2002 when I was preparing for a technical college entrance examinations. I found it to be very fascinating self-improvement book and among other things this technique of scribbling did appeal to me a lot. Somehow it seemed very easy to me and I did want to sharpen my intelligence. I was a meritorious student in school but I wanted to inculcate innovative, creative and original thinking. I started scribbling on a regular basis. I kept jotting down my random ideas, feelings and observations. I accumulated hundreds of notebooks over the years. I internalized this practice and it also became a type of meditation for me. I had to eventually burn  many notebooks down because they became an extra baggage which constantly needed to be taken care of. I felt immensely relieved when I burnt many notebooks together and watched it silently with my friend. I still remember that evening and that fire which consumed them and released the energy which was trapped inside those notebooks.

Win Wenger, a pioneer in education.

I was strictly against the idea of becoming a writer. I used to think that writing is diametrically opposite to what is called freenoting by Win Wenger. Freenoting is similar to his prime technique image-streaming which is describing out loud your images to a live listener or to an audio tape while trying to use multiple senses simultaneously. Image streaming enhances perception by doing something which is called pole-bridging. In simple terms it increases interconnections between neurons located in the different sections of your brain. Freenoting is writing down your ideas as soon as you get them no matter how trivial they seem. It’s based on the first law of behavioral psychology–you get more of what you reinforce. If you record your ideas as soon as they occur–you reinforce the behavior of becoming perceptive–but if you discard them–you reinforce the behavior of becoming dull. In course of time you find that volume of high quality perceptions starts increasing. Writing is essentially done for an audience. No matter how much you deny it–while writing you’re constantly imagining your reader reading your thoughts and feelings. This brings in, an editor–which deletes most of the perception which seem uninteresting because your writing must engage your readers–it’s the criterion for success. Writer has to consistently struggle with the pressure of content management, presentation and editing. In the language of Vedic Astrology–a writer has to have a strong third house because it’s important for the packaging of the material. You can search this blog for various combinations required for becoming an author in any nativity. The third house and Mercury are prime factors in my opinion.

Scribbling has mostly to do with the 12th and the 5th houses. It has very little to do with the 2nd house which represents linguistic prowess. Very little to do with the 3rd house packaging. It’s the quick streaming of perceptions–bringing ideas forth from the subconscious to the conscious before they’re edited by the harsh conscious editor. The 5th house is the house of intelligence–of genius–of divine prudence. The 12th is the house of universal consciousness–the final liberation. The deep perceptions from the 12th become divine messages into the domain 5th as a scribbler continues to scribble uninhibited. These are the types of heavenly powers Emanuel Swedenborg has talked about.

With the continuous contact with electronic mail and internet forums–I started producing voluminous contents online. Then I started to feel that it’s easier and more neat to keep your ideas recorded in forums and on blogs. Besides you also receive feedback which is so valuable for improving your perceptivity. After a while as things kept happening in life–I stopped being obsessive scribbler and lost interest in recording my ideas online or offline. But later on as integration kept happening I started to feel that there wasn’t really much opposition between the writer and the scribbler–the chasm was becoming invisible by and by. Though I kept diaries where I used pen and paper to scribble quickly–I found that writing with keyboard was becoming easier with practice. Now I feel that scribbler and the writer have merged into each other–they’ve become one. And I am not that one because I keep witnessing him. It all is happening inside the witness now. There’s not much interest in improving intelligence–though I know that I’ve internalized certain knacks to improve perceptivity–as I once desired it so deeply.

image source: here and here and here

Proof (2005)

It’s a beautiful mystery film with a few twists. Gwyneth Paltrow’s performance is what seals it as a wonderful film. She irritates you with her emotionally repellant hermit personality. You start to hate her before you start to love her. Jake Gyllenhaal(named hal in this film!), Hope Davis and Anthony Hopkins have also done a brilliant job. The film is about a mathematical proof and about a genius who has to cope with immense emotional stress and trauma. But you don’t have to like Math to like this film–if you like mystery–you might like watching this film too. The film is based on a Pulitzer prize winning story.

image source: here