All Hallow’s Eve Poem

In this part of the world Halloween is not celebrated. I don’t know how Halloween started. I was not even aware that it’s celebrated on the last evening of October before reading Edwina’s beautiful poem.

Halloween reminds me of film Scream which I watched in my college days. Then its parodies which were packed with others like Grudge–they were hilarious! Halloween also reminds me of pumpkins–I don’t know why but you see a lot of pumpkins and Jack-o-lanterns don’t you?

Pumpkins with shapes like faces in night! I have mostly seen Halloween in films. It’s one of the most fun festivals I must say–it is the most eerie and bizarre of all celebrations.

Even this poem, as I was reading it on the Reader had so many pumpkins on it–every stanza has pumpkins so my guess is right–pumpkins do have to do something with Halloween!

Hall-o–Ween!

Hall of Ween!

Hallow of a Queen!

Hallo of a Ween?

Whatever!

Thanks Edwina, for this beautiful humorous poem and giving me a reason to rant about Halloween–as I know nothing about Halloween–Trick or Treat! It’s always a Trick–never a treat without a trick you know!

Happy Halloween!

Edwina's Episodes

As darkness descends upon us

And the moon casts an eerie glow

On the last day of October

It is All Hallows Eve, you know

🎃🎃🎃🎃

Where souls of those once departed

Come back once more to roam

Visiting their old haunts

Finding their way back home

🎃🎃🎃🎃

Some of them are banshees

Screaming in the night

Or ugly, warty witches

That look an awful fright

🎃🎃🎃🎃

Vampires who are looking

For someone’s blood to suck

Zombies from the graveyard

Decayed, and covered in muck.

🎃🎃🎃🎃

There are ghosts and there are werewolves

All of which you’ll meet

When you answer your front door bell

And the kids yell ‘Trick or Treat!’

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8 thoughts on “All Hallow’s Eve Poem

  1. “jack-o’-lanterns”—the name comes from an Irish folktale about a man named Stingy Jack—originated in Ireland, where large turnips and potatoes served as an early canvas. Irish immigrants brought the tradition to America, home of the pumpkin, and it became an integral part of Halloween festivities.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. No I have not seen that video yet. My internet connection is so slow as it is the month end and I have exhausted high speed limit. I will keep it in mind and see. Thanks for the recommendation and kind words 🙂

      Love and light ❤

      Anand 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

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